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Trust, Greed, Bullets & Bourbon (Review)

 

"I have no reservations in saying that I highly recommend this film and applaud Kawczynski for his first feature directorial effort..."

by Randy Krinsky

It was a group of thieves on a easy heist. The plan was simple. If anything went wrong, everyone goes their separate way and, in five years, we reconvene and divvy up the loot. Well, something did go wrong, and one lone thief, David, took the fall. Now, five years later, David is out of prison and the group of thieves are called together at a desolated cabin in upstate New York.

Their hopes are to finally divide up the diamonds they stole. But it's not going to be that easy. The group ring leader, Franky, recently deceased, has left a trail of breadcrumbs for the group to follow. Each clue bringing them closer to the missing diamonds and closer to finding out what went wrong on that fateful day; a day that cost one member his freedom. Tensions mount and loyalties are tested as everyone searches for answers, and the missing diamonds.

Trust, Greed, Bullets & Bourbon
Written & Directed by Scott Kawczynski
Cast Max Casella, Eric Morris, Larisa Polonsky
Release Date 11 December 2014
Randy's Grade: B

Scott Kawczynski has graduated with honors from the art department to full-fledged film director. His directorial debut has an interesting setting, with some great characters, and an easy-to-follow plot. The reveal at the end was the pay off I was rooting for throughout the film, yet I never saw it coming.

Kawczynski weaves the plot through character alliances and back-stabbing, leaving the audience never really knowing for whom to cheer. The character of David (Eric Morris), likeable as he was, was played a little too yielding and the suspense could've been built better. However, I never found the film lacking in story or tone.

The editing and pacing were top notch. Without giving away spoilers, I will say standouts for me were the deep-in-debt Tyler (portrayed by the talented Max Casella), the ambiguous Circe (Kathryn Merry), and the seemingly clueless neighbor, Hector Paarstossel (Danny Burstein).

I have no reservations in saying that I highly recommend this film and applaud Kawczynski for his first feature directorial effort; a great crime drama with a tad of mystery thrown in for good measure. A tip of the hat to you, sir, good job!

Read my interview with Scott Kawczynski here.

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